Dykeman Park

Dykeman Hatch House

Dykeman Hatch House

Dykeman Park is a 56 acre area surrounding historic Dykeman Springs. It is a preserved open space and Dykeman Springs is on the National Register of Historic places.  Dykeman Springs were originally called Indian Head Springs for the Delaware Indians that were living there in 1730. Dykeman Springs is surrounded by Dykeman Park, which is open from dawn until dusk. The park includes several trails (with benches): The Dykeman Walking Trail, The Dykeman Park Meadow Trail, The Dykeman Park Upland Trail as well as two ponds, several picnic tables and Dykeman Baseball Field.

Civil War Significance: The Confederate troops, numbering 20,000, set up an encampment here on June 25, 1863. A few days later the troops were sent to Gettysburg and by July 4th, 1863 close to half the men were killed, wounded or missing. 

Dykeman Trails

Click on the map for a pdf!

Click on the map for a pdf!

Click on the photo above for a pdf!

Click on the photo above for a pdf!


Dykeman Pond and Ducks

A mother duck and her ducklings.

A mother duck and her ducklings.

As delightful as it can be for children to throw crumbs of bread to ducks on the pond, the word is out that feeding ducks and other wild birds can damage their health and their habitat.

Here is some practical information to help parents and children understand that they can best protect and enjoy the ducks and geese by letting them seek their own food. This also helps the pond,

Some of the benefits of refraining from feeding the waterfowl include the following:   

  •         The waterfowl stay healthy by eating a varied diet
  •         It prevents overcrowding and aggression among the waterfowl
  •         Young fowl are protected from predators attracted to human food
  •         The pond stays cleaner

Here are some links to more information: